Amphibians

Spring Peeper

The Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) is one of Vermont's smallest frogs. Peepers fill their vocal sacs with air until they look like a balloon, then they let out a "peep" as they release the air. Its call can either be a short ascending whistle or it may be broken into a series of ascending peeps.

Eastern Newt

The Eastern Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) as a juvenile is reddish-orange with slightly bumpy skin. As an adult, the Eastern Newt turns olive green and their bellies reveal scattered black spots on a bright yellow background. They reach 5 inches in length. Juveniles and adults both have a dark horizontal line going through their eyes and rows of red spots outlined in black along their backs.

Blue-Spotted Salamander

Blue-Spotted Salamander

Roughly 360 million years ago, the first vertebrates heaved themselves out of the ocean to begin life on land. These animals were amphibians. Although there were once 15 major groups of amphibians, today only three remain: frogs and toads, salamanders, and wormlike animals called caecilians found only in the tropics.

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Amphibians: Spring Peeper

Amphibians: Blue Spotted Salamander

Amphibians: Red-Backed Salamander

Amphibians: Eastern Newt

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Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife
Commissioner Louis Porter

1 National Life Drive
Fish & Wildlife LogoDavis 2
Montpelier, VT 05620-3702
802-828-1000
fwinformation@vermont.gov

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The mission of the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is the conservation of all species of fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the people of Vermont.