Mammals

Porcupine

Porcupine

The porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum) is best known for the sharp quills that cover its body. A slow moving, medium-sized mammal, the porcupine has poor eyesight and relies on its sense of hearing and smell, as well as its quills to avoid predators.

Muskrat

Muskrat

The muskrat (Ondatra zibethica) is a common semi-aquatic species found throughout Vermont. It is much smaller than a beaver, but larger than most other rodents. The muskrat also differs from the beaver in the shape of its tail; the muskrat has a long, vertically flattened tail, while the beaver's tail is flattened horizontally.

Mink

Mink

The mink (Mustela vison) is a highly prized furbearer. It is a member of the weasel family, and is larger than both the long-tailed and short-tailed weasel. It is also one of the most aquatic members of the weasel family.

Long-Tailed Weasel

Long-tailed Weasel

The long-tailed weasel (Mustela frenata) is closely related to the short-tailed weasel (ermine), mink, river otter, pine marten and fisher. The long-tailed weasel is larger than the short-tailed weasel, but is smaller than the mink, pine marten, and fisher.

Gray Squirrel

Gray Squirrel

The gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is also known as the bannertail, silvertail, and cat squirrel. It can be found in mature hardwood forests dominated by hard mast, or nut producing trees such as oak, hickory, and beech. It seldom frequents softwood stands, which are more commonly used by the red squirrel.

Gray Fox

Gray Fox

The gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus ) is a native to Vermont and can be found throughout most of the United States. Slightly smaller than its cousin, the red fox, it prefers wooded habitat. It is also known as the flying fox or tree fox because unlike most canids the gray fox has semi-retractable claws, which enable it to climb.

Fisher

Fisher

The fisher (Martes pennati), also known as the fishercat, pekan (French), otchock (Cree), otshilik (Ojibwan), and historically as the wejack (early European settlers), is a member of the weasel family. The variety of names attributed to this animal hints at its wide northern distribution. Other similar and closely related animals include the pine marten and mink.

Eastern Cottontail

Historically, Vermont was home to two species of cottontail rabbit. They look similar and are almost impossible to tell apart in the field. New England cottontail rabbits are a native species that have resided in this state since pre-colonial times. Today, New England cottontails are extremely rare and, if present at all in Vermont, are confined to the most southerly part of the state.

Eastern Chipmunk

The eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus) is a very common and well-known rodent. It is a forest species, but is also very comfortable living around near people. The chipmunk is a fun to watch as it scampers about; however, if it moves into a house, it can cause considerable damage.

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Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife
Commissioner Louis Porter

1 National Life Drive
Fish & Wildlife LogoDavis 2
Montpelier, VT 05620-3702
802-828-1000
fwinformation@vermont.gov

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