Hunting

Vermont Shooting Ranges

Here is a map of shooting ranges in Vermont, including information on the types of firearms allowed and shooting sports available.

Youth Turkey Weekend

The weekend prior to the opening day of the Spring Turkey Season is reserved for youth—15 years old or younger who have successfully completed a hunter education course— to hunt turkeys.

Female Youth with Turkey

Hunting for turkeys during the youth turkey weekend is statewide.

West Mountain Shooting Range

West Mountain Shooting Range

West Mountain Shooting Range in East Haven is free and open to the public, featuring a 100-yard shooting range and target frames set at 25, 50, 75 and 100 yard distances.

Location:

The West Mountain Shooting Range is located on the South American Pond Road on the West Mountain Wildlife Management Area in East Haven.

Hammond Cove Shooting Range

Hammond Cove Shooting Range

Hammond Cove Shooting Range in Hartland is free and open to the public, featuring a six-port 100-yard rifle range and a pistol bench.

LOCATION:

The Hammond Cove Shooting Range is located at the end of Ferry Road in Hartland -

Vermont Habitat Stamp

Funds raised from sales of Vermont Habitat Stamps go to the Species and Habitat Conservation Fund and is used to purchase and manage wildlife habitat in Vermont.

Furbearer Hunting and Trapping

Furbearer header image

Regulated hunting and trapping play important roles in conservation and management of furbearers. Trapping in Vermont is strictly regulated by the department, ensuring Vermont’s wildlife populations will be conserved for future generations of Vermonters.

License Requirements

To purchase a trapping license you must have either:

Small Game

Cottontail RabbitVermont's varied habitats are home to locally abundant populations of cottontail rabbits, snowshoe hare, and gray squirrels.

Canada Lynx or Bobcat? - Learn the Difference

Canada Lynx and Bobcat

Canada Lynx are a state endangered and federally threatened species. They are very similar in appearance and habits to bobcats, and their range overlaps with bobcats and other furbearer species. Knowing the difference between a lynx and a bobcat is critical to lynx survival.

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Contact Us

Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife
Commissioner Christopher Herrick

1 National Life Drive
Fish & Wildlife LogoDavis 2
Montpelier, VT 05620-3702
802-828-1000
fwinformation@vermont.gov

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The mission of the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is the conservation of all species of fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the people of Vermont.