Hunting

Furbearer Hunting and Trapping

Furbearer header image

Regulated hunting and trapping play important roles in conservation and management of furbearers. Trapping in Vermont is strictly regulated by the department, ensuring Vermont’s wildlife populations will be conserved for future generations of Vermonters.

License Requirements

To purchase a trapping license you must have either:

Canada Lynx or Bobcat? - Learn the Difference

Canada Lynx and Bobcat

Canada Lynx are a state endangered and federally threatened species. They are very similar in appearance and habits to bobcats, and their range overlaps with bobcats and other furbearer species. Knowing the difference between a lynx and a bobcat is critical to lynx survival.

Furbearers and Trapping

BeaverFurbearer refers to mammals that traditionally have been hunted and trapped primarily for fur. Furbearers that are legally harvested for human use are always common and abundant.

Where to Hunt Waterfowl

Two of the department’s Wildlife Management Areas – Dead Creek and Mud Creek are managed for controlled, public waterfowling, as is the federally owned Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge.
hunter with decoys

Controlled Hunts on WMAs

  • Dead Creek WMA Controlled Hunt Application - Deadline to apply has past - application for the next years hunt will be available in August

Waterfowl

Canada gooseWaterfowl hunters will find some surprisingly good hunting in Vermont. The best waterfowling occurs in the Champlain Valley, where numerous public wetlands and private farmland provide excellent hunting for ducks and geese.

Moose

Bull MooseFor many hunters, drawing a coveted moose hunting permit is the hunt of a lifetime. Moose are managed through a permit lottery system, by management unit, allowing the department to limit or expand the harvest numbers annually by region.

Black Bear

Black BearVermont's most reclusive big-game animal is remarkably abundant. Vermont has one of the densest black bear populations in the country, most commonly found in the Green Mountains and Northeast Kingdom.

Tips and Techniques

Finding a place to hunt is relatively easy, but hunters tend to congregate where deer are most numerous, typically on lowland farm country where posting is also common. However, the hunter who shows respect for the landowner and asks for permission to hunt can often find private land to hunt on.

Looking for Bigger Bucks

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Contact Us

Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife
Commissioner Christopher Herrick

1 National Life Drive
Fish & Wildlife LogoDavis 2
Montpelier, VT 05620-3702
802-828-1000
fwinformation@vermont.gov

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The mission of the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is the conservation of all species of fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the people of Vermont.